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Prior Year Courses

Prior Year Courses

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Prior Year Courses

  • Biology 5N – Tipping Point for Planet Earth: How Close Are We to the Edge?
    • This course explores why the earth is headed toward a tipping point: a change that is so rapid, so extreme, and so unexpected that humanity may not be able to recover. The course covers synergies between people, stuff, storms, hunger, thirst, toxins, disease and war. Students will read chapters from the instructor’s book, Tipping Point for Planet Earth, and will participate in class discussions. Each student will produce their own projects based on one of the course themes.
  • Biology 30N – Extinctions in Near Time
  • Biology 25N – Biogeography of Disease
    • Observers of human health have known for almost two millennia that certain diseases occur at different places at different times. This seminar will target the patterns of disease distribution and the evolutionary and ecological processes that result in such patterns. We will explore how environmental factors, biotic vectors and diffusion explain the distribution of disease. We will investigate both human and non-human diseases. A primary goal will be to explore how environmental changes such as global warming and habitat destruction will alter the future course of disease. Sample syllabus (Fall 2008)
  • Biology 121 – Biogeography
    Biogeography is an upper division/graduate course taught in alternate years. The course emphasizes global distributions of organisms through the Phanerozoic, with emphasis on historical causes. We cover topics such as plate tectonics, island biogeography, climatic change, dispersal, vicariance, ecology of invasions, extinction, gradients, and diversity. 3 units, Spring 2004.
  • Biology 122 – On the Track of the Yellowstone Hotspot: Fusion of Art and Science (with Gail Wight and Robyn Dunbar)
    • The 20-million-year-old track of the Yellowstone hotspot through western North America, using the field setting to investigate ecology, evolution, and geology through an aesthetic and documentary media lens. Students create: experiential ways to learn about the natural world; a scientific yet personal intimacy about how ecosystems work and how they change; and ways to convey their observations to the public. Required trip to Yellowstone National Park. Spring 2010.
  • Biology 128 – Story Mapping Climate Change
    • Forces of global change (eg., climate disruption, biodiversity loss, disease) impart wide-ranging political, socioeconomic, and ecological impacts, creating an urgent need for science communication. Students will collect data for a region of the US using sources ranging from academic journals to popular media and create an interactive Story Map that merges the scientific and human dimensions of global change. Students will interview stakeholders as part of a community-engaged learning experience and present the Map to national policy-makers. Our 2014 Map is being used by the CA Office of Planning & Research.
  • Biology 136 – Evolutionary Paleobiology
    • Evolutionary Paleobiology presents a paleontological approach to evolutionary theory. Macroevolution, speciation, heterochrony, evolutionary constraint, coevolution, the Cambrian Explosion, and mass extinctions are amongst the topics that are covered. The course format is lecture with a weekly discussion section focused on assigned primary literature. This course is intended for upper division and graduate students. This class meets for lecture twice a week, with an additional one-hour discussion per week. 4 units, Winter 2004.
    • Sample syllabus (Winter 2005-2006)
  • Biology 186 / Biology 286 – Natural History of the Vertebrates (with Rebecca Terry)
    • Broad survey of the diversity of vertebrate life. Discussion of the major branches of the vertebrate evolutionary tree, with emphasis on evolutionary relationships and key adaptations as revealed by the fossil record and modern phylogenetics. Modern orders introduced through an emphasis on natural history, physiology, behavioral ecology, community ecology, and conservation. Lab sessions focused on comparative skeletal morphology through hands-on work with skeletal specimens. Discussion of field methods and experience with our local vertebrate communities through field trips to several of California’s distinct biomes. Prerequisite: Biology core. Spring 2010.
  • Biology 326 – Foundations of Biogeography (with Tad Fukami)
    • Seminar. Focus on classic papers covering the global distribution and abundance of organisms through time. Topics include: phylogenetics, phylogeography, plate tectonics, island biogeography, climatic change, dispersal, vicariance, ecology of invasions, extinction, gradients, diversity, conservation and a history of the field. Winter 2010.
  • BioSci 325/GES 325 – Evolution of Body Size (co-taught with J. Payne, GES)
    • We investigate of the influence of organism size on evolutionary and ecological patterns and processes, using the primary literature. This course integrates theoretical principles, observations of living organisms, and data from the fossil record. Questions addressed include: What are the physiological and ecological correlates of body size? Is there an optimum size? Do organisms tend to evolve to larger size? Does size affect the likelihood of extinction or speciation? How does size scale from the genome to the phenotype? How is metabolic rate involved in evolution of body size? This course is intended as a discussion seminar for upper division undergraduates and graduate students. Priority is given to graduate students. Taught Spring 2007.
  • OSPSANTG 25 – Evolution and Ecology of the South American Biota
    • Students weave together ecology, evolution, paleontology, geology, geography, and philosophy of science to appreciate evolution of the South American biota. Course is built around primary literature that exposes students to the spectacular landscapes and unique biota of South America. We investigate topics such as plate tectonics, mountain uplift and ocean circulation and how those physical events influence macroevolution, speciation, coevolution, migration events, and mass extinctions. The course will conclude with special challenges facing global conservation efforts on this spectacular continent. Taught Fall 2007-2008 in Santiago, Chile.
    • Sample syllabus (Fall 2007)

Dr. Hadly has also rotated in the Bio core, in Bio 301, 302, 303, and in Ethics (required for graduate students).

Teaching Profile